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See the OXYTROL Patch Application Video


Questions About Overactive Bladder (OAB)
How many people are affected by OAB?
How many people use OAB medications?
How do OAB medications work?

Questions about OXYTROL
What is OXYTROL?
Why is OXYTROL a patch instead of a pill and how does the patch work?
How do I apply OXYTROL?
How often do I have to put on a new patch?
What should I do if I forget to change my patch?
Can I bathe, swim, or shower with the patch on?
How do I remove the patch?
Will I have dry mouth as I did with the pills I took for my overactive bladder?
"I'm nervous about having a patch on my skin. Will there be irritation?"
From what material is OXYTROL made?
What is the dosing schedule for OXYTROL?
What are the benefits of using a patch to treat OAB?
How effective is OXYTROL?
What should I do if the patch comes off?
How should OXYTROL be stored?
What should I avoid while using OXYTROL?
What are the possible side effects of OXYTROL?
Who are the best candidates for OXYTROL?
Who should not use OXYTROL?

 

How many people are affected by OAB?
OAB is under diagnosed, and those affected are often embarrassed and reluctant to speak to their family, friends or physicians about their condition, and may even think that the condition is inevitable with age. OAB is quite common with more than 33 million Americans suffering from OAB.

How many people use OAB medications?
One in three women aged 30-59 have experienced some form of urinary incontinence at some point in their lives and, according to a recent survey, only one in four OAB sufferers have used prescription medication to treat their OAB symptoms.

How do OAB medications work?
Anticholinergic drug therapy is the most common type of medication used to treat OAB, with oxybutynin being widely accepted and prescribed in oral form for almost 30 years. Anticholinergic drug therapy inhibits the involuntary muscle activity of the bladder, allowing the muscles that surround the urethra to contract and retract only when necessary. Daily dose oral medications deliver the drug all at once or continuously for 24 hours. The OXYTROL transdermal delivery system delivers oxybutynin into the blood stream through the skin consistently and continuously for up to 4 days (96 hours).

What is OXYTROL?
OXYTROL is a transdermal (skin patch) system designed to treat overactive bladder. Each patch contains a drug called oxybutynin. It is dissolved in the adhesive layer that attaches the patch to your skin. The patch delivers active drug into your bloodstream through the skin, unlike oral OAB therapies.

Why is OXYTROL a patch instead of a pill and how does the patch work?
Patch therapy, like oral therapies, has been proven to help reduce OAB symptoms. Unlike pills, which are swallowed, oxybutynin delivered from a patch is not broken down in the digestive tract. Much less oxybutynin in the patch is broken down (metabolized) by the body into a chemically active substance known as N-desethyloxybutynin (N-DEO). Scientists think that this chemical may play a role in producing the medication's most troublesome side effects, such as dry mouth and constipation.

Ease of use is another difference between patch and pill therapies. Instead of having to remember to take a pill, OXYTROL is applied 2 times a week to your abdomen, hip, or buttock.

OXYTROL provides consistent, ALL-DAY, ALL-NIGHT delivery of oxybutynin into your bloodstream. The active drug does not have to pass through the digestive tract to get into your bloodstream.

How do I apply OXYTROL?
To see just how easy it is to apply OXYTROL, ask your doctor to apply your first patch in the office to start you off right. Put the patch on a clean, dry, and smooth (fold-free) area of skin on your abdomen, hip, or buttock as shown in the pictures below. Keep a relaxed posture and don't arch your back and don't stretch the skin while applying the patch, so the patch doesn't wrinkle when you relax or let the skin go. Skin should be free of moisturizers or lotion. Some patients find it helpful to rub their fingers around the edges in a circle to make sure the edges of the patch adhere.

Avoid putting the patch on your waistline, where tight clothing may rub against it. The areas you choose should not be oily, cut or scraped or otherwise damaged, or be places where there are rashes or other skin problems.Wear the patch all the time until it is time to apply a new one. Be sure to remember to rotate the patch through different sites. Do not apply to the same site within 7 days.

See the Oxytrol Patch Application Video

How often do I have to put on a new patch?
You need to put on a new OXYTROL patch only 2 times a week (every 3 to 4 days): Sunday/Wednesday; Monday/Thursday; Tuesday/Friday; Wednesday/Saturday; Thursday/Sunday; Friday/Monday; or Saturday/Tuesday. Record the schedule you plan to follow and always change OXYTROL on the 2 days of the week you mark on the calendar.

What should I do if I forget to change my patch?

If you forget to change your patch when you are supposed to, remove the old patch as soon as you remember, put on a new patch in a different area, and continue to follow your original schedule.

Can I bathe, swim, or shower with the patch on?
Contact with water will not affect how the patch works. Nevertheless, you should try to avoid rubbing the patch during these activities. It is unlikely that the patch will fall off. If some of it lifts up, just press the edge back in place. As long as 75% of the patch adheres, you are getting enough drug. If it falls off completely-which is very unusual-put a new patch on in a different area and follow your original application schedule.

If you shower before applying the patch, be sure to dry yourself very thoroughly. Wait a few minutes to be sure you are applying the patch to clean, dry skin. Run your finger around the edges of the patch several times to help ensure the patch stays on.

How do I remove the patch?
Remove the patch carefully and slowly to avoid skin damage. If there is adhesive left, gentle washing with warm soapy water should remove it. You can use baby oil, or if necessary, a medical adhesive removal pad you can buy at a drug store. You should not use alcohol or nail polish remover, which may irritate the skin.

Will I have dry mouth as I did with the pills I took for my overactive bladder?
Because OXYTROL is a patch that delivers medicine into your bloodstream and to your bladder, you are less likely to experience troublesome anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth and constipation. If you have any problems after the patch is applied, consult your physician.

"I'm nervous about having a patch on my skin. Will there be irritation?"
If you follow the instructions your physician gives you, you may not experience any side effects. Your doctor chose OXYTROL because it works and has a low occurrence of troublesome anticholinergic side effects, such as dry mouth and constipation. However, if you do experience side effects, be sure to talk about them with your physician.

As OXYTROL is applied to the skin, it's important to remember that a majority of patients in clinical trials did not experience application site irritation. Only 6.4% and 5.0% of patients using OXYTROL reported severe application-site reactions in 2 separate studies.

Usually any skin irritation around the patch can be managed by being extra gentle when you remove the patch and by changing the location of the patch. Avoid placing the patch on the same spot within 7 days. If there is a rash extending beyond the area where the patch was applied, let your physician know, as you may have an allergy to the drug.

From what material is OXYTROL made?
The OXYTROL patch is latex free and made of three layers. The first layer is the backing film, while the second layer contains oxybutynin, skin permeability enhancer and adhesive; the third layer is the release liner.

What is the dosing schedule for OXYTROL?
OXYTROL delivers 3.9 milligrams (mg) of oxybutynin, a medication widely accepted and prescribed in oral formulations for almost 30 years, into the blood stream through the skin consistently and continuously for up to 4 days (96 hours). This allows for convenient twice weekly dosing.

What are the benefits of using a patch to treat OAB?

  • Convenient twice weekly dosing
  • Long lasting
  • Achieves therapeutic levels at less than half the daily dose of oral immediate release oxybutynin
  • Easy to use
  • Easy to wear
  • Discrete and does not limit activities

How effective is OXYTROL?
In two phase 3 clinical trials, OXYTROL patients experienced up to a 75% reduction in urinary incontinence episodes (Study 1 = 61% reduction, Study 2 = 75% reduction) compared to a 50% reduction in both placebo groups. Moreover, OXYTROL offers OAB patients continuous bladder control with a low incidence of drying side effects, such as dry mouth and constipation.

What should I do if the patch comes off?
OXYTROL was designed to stick for up to 4 days. If the patch starts to lift off your skin, apply a little bit of pressure using your fingertips. Very rarely will the patch come off completely. If it does, try putting the same patch back on the same spot. If it sticks firmly all over, leave it on. If not, take it off and put a new patch on a new spot. No matter what day this happens, continue with the twice-a-week schedule that you have marked on your patch box.

How should OXYTROL be stored?
Store at room temperature, 25 C (77 F). Temporary storage between 15 C and 30 C (59 F - 86 F) is also permitted. Keep OXYTROL and all medications in a safe, secure place and out of the reach of children.

What should I avoid while using OXYTROL?
Do not expose the patch to sunlight. Therefore, wear it under clothing.

What are the possible side effects of OXYTROL?
You may see mild redness at the site when a patch is removed. This redness should disappear within several hours after removing the patch. If uncomfortable irritation or excessive itchiness continues, tell your doctor. Oxybutynin may cause sleepiness or blurred vision, so be careful when driving or operating machinery. In addition, sleepiness may be increased by drinking alcohol (beer, wine or hard liquor). Since oxybutynin treatment may decrease sweating, you may overheat or have fever or heat stroke if you are in warm or hot temperatures.

The most common side effects of OXYTROL are skin reactions where the patch is put on. These include itching and redness. Other side effects include dry mouth, constipation, abnormal vision and headache. If you take other medicines that cause dry mouth, constipation, or sleepiness, OXYTROL can increase those effects.

These are not all the side effects of OXYTROL, for a list of all side effects, please see full prescribing information.

Who are the best candidates for OXYTROL?
OXYTROL is indicated for patients who are diagnosed with OAB with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency and frequency. Only your doctor can determine if OXYTROL is right for you.

Who should not use OXYTROL?
Do not use OXYTROL if you have the following medical conditions:

  • Urinary retention. Your bladder does not empty or does not empty completely when you urinate.
  • Gastric retention. Your stomach empties slowly or incompletely after a meal.
  • Uncontrolled narrow-angle glaucoma (high pressure in your eye). Tell your doctor if you have glaucoma or a family history of glaucoma.
  • Pregnancy or breastfeeding. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. OXYTROL may not be right for you.
  • Allergy to oxybutynin or the inactive ingredients in OXYTROL. If you need to know the inactive ingredients, ask your doctor or pharmacist. If you have allergies to medical tape products or other skin patches, tell your doctor.

If you have certain other medical conditions, use OXYTROL with caution.

Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, especially if you have any of the following:

  • Liver disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Bladder obstruction (blockage)
  • Gastrointestinal obstruction (blockage in the digestive system)
  • Ulcerative colitis (inflamed bowels)
  • Myasthenia gravis (nerve weakness)
  • Gastric reflux disease or esophagitis (inflamed esophagus, the tube between your mouth and stomach)
     
    Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines and supplements. Some of them may cause problems if you take OXYTROL. Also, OXYTROL may affect how some of them work.